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  • South Chines tiger (Pan­thera tigris ssp. amoyen­sis)
201223Apr20:51

Nasa’s State of Flux shows our ever chang­ing world

Infor­ma­tion
pub­lished 23 April 2012 | mod­i­fied 23 April 2012
archived

The gallery, which can be found at http://​cli​mate​.nasa​.gov/​s​o​f , presents stun­ning images, mostly from space, of our ever-​changing planet, chron­i­cling changes tak­ing place over time peri­ods rang­ing from days to centuries.

Each image pair in the con­tin­u­ously updated gallery high­lights before-​and-​after impacts of change, includ­ing the destruc­tion wrought by extreme events such as wild­fires and floods, the retreat of glac­i­ers caused by cli­mate change, and the expand­ing foot­print of urban areas due to pop­u­la­tion growth.

It under­scores how frag­ile and inter­con­nected our planet is, and how it is con­stantly chang­ing. With this new ver­sion of the gallery, we want peo­ple to be bet­ter able to immerse them­selves in the images, and gain that sense of perspective

The redesigned gallery, which cur­rently fea­tures more than 160 com­par­i­son views, is now orga­nized and sortable by cat­e­gories, includ­ing ice, human impact, water, land cover and extreme events. A selec­tion of some of the Global Cli­mate Change web­site team’s favorite images is high­lighted in a new “Top Picks” category.

Another new fea­ture is a map view, which places each image into its geo­graph­i­cal con­text. Guests can zoom in to spe­cific loca­tions on the map, or select by region, and see where par­tic­u­lar changes are tak­ing place around the globe. They can also share links to each image set and down­load high-​resolution ver­sions of the images.

See­ing our planet from space gives us a global view that we can’t get else­where,” said Amber Jenk­ins, edi­tor of the Global Cli­mate Change web­site, who estab­lished the gallery in 2009.

NASA’s Global Cli­mate Change web­site is devoted to improv­ing the public’s under­stand­ing of Earth’s chang­ing cli­mate, pro­vid­ing easy-​to-​understand infor­ma­tion about the causes and effects of cli­mate change and how NASA stud­ies it. For more on NASA’s Earth Sci­ence activ­i­ties, visit: http://​www​.nasa​.gov/​t​o​p​i​c​s​/​e​a​r​t​h​/​i​n​d​e​x​.​h​t​m​l.

The above news item is reprinted from mate­ri­als avail­able at Sci­enceDaily. Orig­i­nal text may be edited for con­tent and length.

(Source: Sci­encedaily, 20.04.2012)

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